Webinar on New Administration: What’s the Next Step for…

Under the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, the world has experienced a year of deep uncertainty, profound changes, and major disruption. The Sino-US relations have encountered great difficulties. In the New Year with the new US government coming to power, regarding the education policy, will there be any change for the better when the new US Administration takes office? Will the education sector face new challenges?

To address these hot topics, on January 16th, 2021 (Beijing Time), the Committee on Study Abroad Services, China Education Association for International Exchange (COSA-CEAIE) and the Research Institute of International Education South-South Cooperation linked up to hold a high grade forum of “the Webinar on New Administration: What’s the Next Step for Sino-US Education Cooperation? ”.

Date & Time (TBC) :

09:00-11:00 am (Beijing Time) January 16th, 2021

20:00-22:00 (EST) January 15th, 2021

VENUE

This is an online event.

Due to the number limitation of participants by Zoomplease watch the live broadcast of this forum through the link below . Thank you for your participation and cooperation.

English ChannelClick the link to watch the Webinar on NEW ADMINISTRATION: WHAT’S THE NEXT STEP FOR SINO-US EDUCATION COOPERATION ?

https://mr.baidu.com/r/g5n2D7j3kA?f=cp&u=b1c98c0892b8a09f

【中文频道】中美教育合作的未来展望线上论坛观看链接:

https://m.weibo.cn/7467612663/4592862841015640

OPENING REMARKS BY Mr. Cen Jianjun

Former Minister Counselor (Education) of Chinese Embassy in the US

Former Director General of the Department of the International Cooperation and Exchange Ministry of Education Chairman Association for Study Abroad Services,CEAIE

Chief Supervisor, Beijing Royal School.

GUEST SPEAKERS:

Dr. Lan Xue

Dean, Schwarzman College, Tsinghua University

Dr. Susan Sclafani

Former Assistant Secretary for Vocational and Adult Education, U.S. Department of Education

Vice President of Forum for World Education (FWE)

Ambassador Julia Chang Bloch

The first Asian-American Ambassadress of US

President of the US-China Education Trust

Dr. Cheng Davis

Co-Founder and Chairperson of Forum for World

Education (FWE)

Special Advisor to the President of the University of Pennsylvania

Stephen T. Golding

Senior Advisor to the President of Ohio University

Executive-in-Resident at the University’s Voinovich

School of Leadership and Public Affairs.

Prof. Jia Qingguo

Former Dean of School of International Relations, Peking University

Professor of Diplomacy and International Relations at Peking University

Mr. Daniel B. Wright.

Founder,President and CEO of GreenPoint Group

Mr. Wang Guangfa

Vice President of Council for Promoting South-South Cooperation

President of Beijing Fazheng Group

Chief Principal of Beijing Royal School

Mr. Yu Lizhong

First Chancellor of New York University Shanghai

 

The Committee on Study Abroad Services, China Education Association for International Exchange (COSA-CEAIE)

 

 

 

The Research Institute of International Education South-South Cooperation

Forum for World Education and ETS Announce Collaboration to…

The Forum for World Education (FWE) and ETS (Educational Testing Service) have agreed to collaborate to bring ETS’s unique blend of expertise in assessment, research, and analysis to support education agencies around the world. Working with FWE, ETS will assist education ministries and their affiliated examination agencies in using advances in the learning sciences, technology, and educational measurement to make assessment more responsive to the needs of educators, students, parents and policymakers.

We are excited to be working with ETS, an organization that has invented so much of what is used around the world in assessment today. In these unprecedented times, they continue to innovate toward a future of assessments that not only measure learning, but also helps to guide and directly contribute to it,” said Cheng Davis, Secretary General of FWE.

Through this collaboration, ETS and FWE will help organizations in many areas, including: moving assessments to digital delivery; establishing remote proctoring; measuring social-emotional learning; applying new and existing analysis techniques to improve the fairness and validity of tests; capitalizing on big data; helping teachers develop their formative assessment practices; and measuring learning processes and growth in student thinking.

The pandemic has posed many challenges for education and more specifically, educational assessment, with a post-pandemic era undoubtedly bringing more,” said Kadriye Ercikan, Vice President of Research and Measurement Sciences at ETS. “However, with these challenges come opportunities for us to be able to help agencies around the world improve what they do in order to increase public trust and maximize their impact on society. We look forward to working with FWE to continue to make a positive impact on learning and teaching.”

UPenn pledges $100 million to the School District of…

Congratulations to University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann, Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney, School Board President Joyce Wilkerson, and Superintendent of the School District of Philadelphia William R. Hite Jr., on their announcement today that Penn will contribute $100 million to the School District of Philadelphia, representing an unprecedented commitment to the City and its public schoolchildren. This is the largest private contribution to the School District in its history.

Penn’s $100 million contribution to the School District—$10 million annually for 10 years—will be used to remediate environmental hazards, including asbestos and lead, in our public school buildings. This funding will have an immediate impact, supplementing the ongoing efforts of the City and District, and enabling them to dramatically accelerate and expand their response to environmental concerns in our public schools.

“Nothing is more important than the health and welfare of our children, and few things are more crucial to a community than the safety and quality of its public schools,” said President Gutmann. “When Philadelphia’s schools and schoolchildren succeed, all Philadelphia succeeds. We are proud to be able to partner with our City and School District to significantly improve the learning environment for Philadelphia’s schoolchildren in a way that will have a long-lasting impact on the health, safety, and wellbeing of our entire City. This historic commitment by the University and Penn Medicine will help support a most critical and immediate need that will benefit generations of Philadelphia students, their teachers, and school staff.”

Read More: https://penntoday.upenn.edu/news/penn-pledges-100-million-school-district-philadelphia

Fazheng Group’s 2020 Integrate to Innovate Forum

The Integrate to Innovate Education Forum is an international education event initiated by Fazheng Group with the support of China Education Association for International Exchange (CEAIE) and the Ministry of Education’s National Center for School Curriculum and Textbook Development. It has been held annually since 2016. Adhering to the concept of innovation, global focus and joint development, the Forum is committed to strengthening the connection between professionals across all fields and promoting exchanges and cooperation in international education.

Read More: The 2020 Integrate to Innovate Education Forum Brochure

Educational Assessment: What to Watch in a Rapidly Changing…

This article is a written adaptation of the Presidential address I gave at the NCME annual conference
in April 2018. The article describes my thoughts on the future of assessment. I discuss eleven likely
characteristics of future tests and, for each characteristic, why I think it is important and what to
watch with respect to it. Next, I outline what is unlikely to change. The article concludes with a
comment about the probable state of education 10 years on and what that state might mean for
members of the assessment community.

Randy E. Bennett, Educational Testing Service

 

Article: The Economic Impacts of Learning Losses

Power Point Presentation: Corona Learning Losses

A framework to guide an education response to the…

Developing an education strategy during the coronavirus crisis

The result of a joint OECD-Harvard Graduate School of Education rapid assessment of education responses to the coronavirus pandemic in almost 100 countries, this report provides policy makers with a framework to develop plans to ensure disruptions to education are minimised during the crisis.

  • Fernando M. Reimers, Global Education Innovation Initiative, Harvard Graduate School of Education
  • Andreas Schleicher, Directorate of Education and Skills, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and DevelopmentA framework to guide an education response to the COVID-19 Pandemic of 2020

As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, so do the risks we face. The COVID-19 pandemic. Has not stopped at national borders, and affected people regardless of nationality, level of education, income or gender. But that has not been true for its consequences, which have hit the most vulnerable hardest. Education is no exception. Those from privileged backgrounds quickly found their way around closed school doors to alternative learning opportunities, supported by their parents and eager to learn. Too often, those from disadvantaged backgrounds have remained shut out if the school shuts down. So this pandemic has exposes the many inequities in our education systems – from the broadband and computers needed for online education, through the supportive environments needed to focus on learning, up to our failure to attract talented teachers to the most challenging classrooms.

But as these inequities are amplified in this time of crisis, this moment also holds the possibility that we won’t return to the status quo when things return to “normal”. It is the nature of our collective and systemic responses to the disruptions that will determine how we are affected by them. There is a lot we can do together. Where school closures are needed in the short term, we can mitigate their impact for learners, families and educators, particularly for those in the most marginalised groups, who don’t have access to digital learning resources or lack the resilience and engagement to learn on their own. We can collaborate internationally to mutualise open online educational resources and digital learning platforms, and encourage technology companies to join this effort. We can rapidly enhance digital learning opportunities for teachers and encourage teacher collaboration beyond boarders. And we can use the momentum to reshape curricula and learning environments to the needs of the 21st century.

China was hit first by Covid-19, but reacted fast. Schools were given the highest priority even when financial resources nationwide were tightening, with a ‘green channel’ ensuring quality and efficiency in rapid procurement during the emergency. The national cloud platform which China launched, offering digital learning resources to students in schools free of charge across the country, has set a good example that learning is not a place, but an activity. And it was not just the government which mobilised resources, a wide range of contributors were stepping forward to provide everything from free wi-fi and devices for students through innovative instructional systems to social support for teachers and schools. This shows how the future of education can become a whole-of-society project. This document sets out the approaches that other countries are pursuing and how far they are advanced on their way.

Download full report:

A framework to guide an education response to the COVID-19 Pandemic of 2020 – English

A framework to guide an education response to the COVID-19 Pandemic of 2020 – Chinese

Educational Research and Innovation: Back to the Future of…

2020, this evocative year of hindsight and foresight, has humbled us with a global shock: the COVID-19
pandemic. We have been reminded that, despite the best laid plans, the truth is that the future likes to
surprise us. To prepare our education systems for what may come, we have to consider not only the
changes that appear most probable, but also the ones that we are not expecting.

There are always multiple versions of the future – some are assumptions, others hopes and fears, or even
signals that something is already changing. Back to the future of education: Four OECD Scenarios for
Schooling provides a set of scenarios on the future of schooling to support long-term strategic thinking in education. These scenarios, which build on the 2001 edition, show us that there is not a single path into the future, but many.

This volume is a companion volume to the Trends Shaping Education series, a triannual publication that
highlights key global megatrends and their potential impact on education. While megatrends focus on
patterns from the past to inspire thinking about the future, scenarios allow us to consider newly emerging patterns and possibilities.

A key question for thinking about the future of education is: To what extent are our current structures
helping or hindering our vision? Put another way, if today we were to meet with a Martian, freshly arrived on planet earth and looking for tips on designing their own education system, what would we suggest?

Would we suggest starting with schools and schooling as we know them now and advise modernising and fine-tuning the system, the conceptual equivalent of reconfiguring windows and doors of a house? Or would we rather recommend an entirely different way to use the people, spaces, time and technology? Whowould be involved in these processes of transformation, and how much of the lifespan would it encompass (infancy? early childhood? adulthood, aligned to labour market? Or lifelong, including learning for our eldest seniors at 80 and 90+ years, a growing cohort as our populations age?)?

The path forward is likely a combination of these two approaches. Revisioning and transforming education is a powerful tool, pushing us to think outside of the box and to go beyond our current limitations. So too is building on what we have, modernising the trusted institutions that play such an important role in the social fabric of our communities and societies.

By using schools and schooling as a starting point, this volume and the four scenarios within it open the
door to both approaches. They can be used to inspire, to dream, to transform. They can be used to
future-proof systems and stress-test against unexpected shocks. Above all, they push us to move beyond
complacency and easy solutions, presenting us with the tensions and paradoxes inherent in all our systems and which we must address. We hope you enjoy the journey. Use them in good health.

Andreas Schleicher
Director for Education and Skills
Special Advisor on Education Policy to the Secretary-General

Full text: (Download PDF) – Back to the Future of Education Four Scenarios for the Future of Schooling

The Economic Impacts of Learning Losses (OECD – Eric…

The worldwide school closures in early 2020 led to
losses in learning that will not easily be made up for even
if schools quickly return to their prior performance levels.
These losses will have lasting economic impacts both on
the affected students and on each nation unless they are
effectively remediated.

While the precise learning losses are not yet known,
existing research suggests that the students in grades 1-12
affected by the closures might expect some 3 percent
lower income over their entire lifetimes. For nations, the
lower long-term growth related to such losses might yield
an average of 1.5 percent lower annual GDP for the
remainder of the century. These economic losses would
grow if schools are unable to re-start quickly.
The economic losses will be more deeply felt by
disadvantaged students. All indications are that students
whose families are less able to support out-of-school
learning will face larger learning losses than their more
advantaged peers, which in turn will translate into deeper
losses of lifetime earnings.

The present value of the economic losses to nations reach
huge proportions. Just returning schools to where they
were in 2019 will not avoid such losses. Only making
them better can. While a variety of approaches might be
attempted, existing research indicates that close attention
to the modified re-opening of schools offers strategies
that could ameliorate the losses. Specifically, with the
expected increase in video-based instruction, matching
the skills of the teaching force to the new range of tasks
and activities could quickly move schools to heightened
performance. Additionally, because the prior disruptions
are likely to increase the variations in learning levels within
individual classrooms, pivoting to more individualised
instruction could leave all students better off as schools
resume.

As schools move to re-establish their programmes even as
the pandemic continues, it is natural to focus considerable
attention on the mechanics and logistics of safe re-opening.
But the long-term economic impacts also require serious
attention, because the losses already suffered demand
more than the best of currently considered re-opening
approaches.

Full text: (Download the PDF) – The Economic Impacts of Learning Losses

How can teachers and school systems respond to the…

 

By Andreas Schleicher

Director, OECD Directorate for Education and Skills

As the world becomes increasingly interconnected, so do the risks we face. The COVID-19 pandemic. Has not stopped at national borders, and affected people regardless of nationality, level of education, income or gender. But that has not been true for its consequences, which have hit the most vulnerable hardest. Education is no exception. Those from privileged backgrounds quickly found their way around closed school doors to alternative learning opportunities, supported by their parents and eager to learn. Too often, those from disadvantaged backgrounds have remained shut out if the school shuts down. So this pandemic has exposes the many inequities in our education systems – from the broadband and computers needed for online education, through the supportive environments needed to focus on learning, up to our failure to attract talented teachers to the most challenging classrooms.

But as these inequities are amplified in this time of crisis, this moment also holds the possibility that we won’t return to the status quo when things return to “normal”. It is the nature of our collective and systemic responses to the disruptions that will determine how we are affected by them. There is a lot we can do together. Where school closures are needed in the short term, we can mitigate their impact for learners, families and educators, particularly for those in the most marginalised groups, who don’t have access to digital learning resources or lack the resilience and engagement to learn on their own. We can collaborate internationally to mutualise open online educational resources and digital learning platforms, and encourage technology companies to join this effort. We can rapidly enhance digital learning opportunities for teachers and encourage teacher collaboration beyond boarders. And we can use the momentum to reshape curricula and learning environments to the needs of the 21st century.

China was hit first by Covid-19, but reacted fast. Schools were given the highest priority even when financial resources nationwide were tightening, with a ‘green channel’ ensuring quality and efficiency in rapid procurement during the emergency. The national cloud platform which China launched, offering digital learning resources to students in schools free of charge across the country, has set a good example that learning is not a place, but an activity. And it was not just the government which mobilised resources, a wide range of contributors were stepping forward to provide everything from free wi-fi and devices for students through innovative instructional systems to social support for teachers and schools. This shows how the future of education can become a whole-of-society project. This document sets out the approaches that other countries are pursuing and how far they are advanced on their way.

Webinar: Covid-19 and the Dental Practice

 

Dr. Willian Cheung (Hong Kong) in conjunction with the International College of Dentists presents on the impact of Covid-19 and the Dental Practice.  Please pre-register and join via Zoom on Wednesday August 12th @ 9:30pm MYT.

Meeting ID: 813 1437 7166

Password: 003991